Human elephant conflict

14 Feb 2019 15:14 - 14 Feb 2019 15:19 #5182 by INFO
Replied by INFO on topic Another death by Elephant
A Monk, Phra Prapop, on the last night of a month's seclusion was killed by wild elephants near Khao Ang Rue nai Wildlife Sanctuary in Chachoengsao. 

On the morning of February 12, a monk from Sammadang monastery returned Phra Prapop’s seclusion site, but found his tent smashed to pieces. Phra Prapop's dead and broken body was about 15 metres away.

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17 Feb 2019 07:17 #5183 by INFO
Replied by INFO on topic Another death by Elephant
Saichon Srisawat, 50, was discovered, on February 15 2019, in undergrowth by the side of the road in the Huay Sat Yai sub-district of Hua Hin that is within the Kaeng Krachan national park.  She had been trampled to death by elephants. Her arms and legs were all broken and her skull was fractured. There were elephant footprints all around. 

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31 Oct 2019 20:13 #5385 by INFO
Replied by INFO on topic Another death by Elephant
Another death by Elephant in Chachoengsao area. Again on a Chachoengsao eucalyptus plantation, which seem to be quite "common" along with rubber plantations bordering the Eastern Forest Complex.

www.nationthailand.com/news/30377938

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08 Sep 2020 12:58 - 08 Sep 2020 13:05 #5477 by INFO
Replied by INFO on topic Human elephant conflict
Another serious human elephant conflict attack in the eastern provinces on a migrant family that camped near where the elephants are know to roam outside the parks of the Eastern Forest complex.




thethaiger.com/news/eastern-thailand/fam...fter-elephant-attack

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09 Sep 2020 21:10 #5479 by onflipflops
Replied by onflipflops on topic Human elephant conflict
Not an elephant, but perhaps interesting to note that again one of the hornbill researchers got attacked by a Gaur. Apparently he was 'lucky' and got away with 'just' a fractured leg. Not sure where it happened. I've seen this researcher many times in Khao Yai, but I guess that is not the only place he studies. Something similar happened years ago, though I believe that time the researcher was more seriously injured.

And tv news was just showing an Asian Black Bear attack. I only saw a bit of it, but the reconstruction showed two ladies and a guy all getting attacked. Near some sugar cane plantation. I didn't hear where this took place

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20 Sep 2020 19:15 #5490 by wvwv
Replied by wvwv on topic Human elephant conflict
What is the advice for approaching or being in close proximity to gaurs then? What sort of distance is safe and what's their general temperament? Should they be treated with the same caution as elephants?

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20 Sep 2020 20:11 #5492 by onflipflops
Replied by onflipflops on topic Human elephant conflict
Well, my personal experience with them is that they tend to be shy and take off before you get close (with the exception of a couple areas where they are more used to seeing people).

My guess is that most cases where it goes wrong is probably when the Gaur are resting/ hiding in dense forest and a person unknowingly gets in close vicinity. But to be fair I have never heard the full stories of these attacks. I only know of one person who seemed to have walked into a situation as I just described.

As with most animals if you get too close they might choose to charge rather than flee.
And to be fair, I think in the case with Gaur there is at that stage not a whole lot you can do. Some say you should lay down on your belly perpendicular to the walking direction of the Gaur. and then hope for the best. It might jump over you. They have quite poor eyesight is my experience. I have been very close standing alone in an open grassland at quite close range and even though they were looking in my direction, me being perfectly visible, it felt like they were just looking right through me. I think only if you make a move that they will actually recognize you as a danger. But when you are laying on your belly, you could be unlucky and it might step on you which I expect to hurt quite a bit...

I guess if any chance I would hide behind trees or better, climb up a tree, but again, if you spook a gaur at close range, it is highly unlikely you get up a tree faster than the gaur can get to you.

In my personal opinion they are much more scary than elephants. Especially because they are much faster, and even more quiet in the forest. Fortunately they usually will probably hear you coming and get away.

I guess if nowhere to hide behind, I would try to move as a Spanish bull fighter haha. Try to jump away last minute and then hopefully try to get away. Surely we humans are more agile, but definitely won't win when it comes to running in a straight line. Still even that would probably only work if you see it coming.

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