Done the South so now a start on the North

30 Dec 2016 13:36 #4153 by Robby L
Replied by Robby L on topic Done the South so now a start on the North
To Doi Inthanon NP 12/12/16



Arrived early afternoon on a Monday which was a holiday, waved through the checkpoint and told to pay at the HQ where they only wanted payment for the nights we camped and the vehicle , in the camp ground there is mostly unoccupied tents everywhere and shops selling about everything you could want, very commercial and people milling about.. Setup camp in what is the caravan area which has separate bays with power, lights and water, toilets across the road have both western and Thai style toilets with hot water in the wheelchair toilet (don’t tell the babbling mob). Set off to do a bit of exploring first off up the road from camp ground to the accommodation then for a couple of kilometers up the road to the Karan Village then back down the main road to the checkpoint where I was asked for the tickets they didn’t give us on the way in. Turned back a short distance up the summit road and walked a short distance up a dirt road 4.5 kilometers from the camp, a place that needs farther exploration.



Oriental Turtle Dove.
.
Next day I went back down the road we had come up to the Huai Sai Luang and Mae Pan Waterfalls. First I had a look at the Huai sai Luang fall which is only about 50 meters from a parking place, nothing of interest there but when I walked back to the road there were flocks of Scarlet Minivet in the trees over the road. The parking place for the Mae Pan Waterfall is about 300 meters farther up a narrow road then there is another 500 meters walk down a not very good track to the fall. A bit of birdlife on the way down and 2 species of Redstart in the stream unfortunately I only got photos of a Plumbeous Redstart and missed out on a White-capped Water redstart.



Plumbeous Redstart.

It was still early so I decided to have a look at the summit where there were hundreds of cars and what looked like thousands of people milling about, to many people for me so I turned around without getting out of the car and headed back down to the to the road I had prospected yesterday. I drove to the end where there is what appears to be a ranger station and had a wander around seeing very little. There is a branch road heading up hill from this road and I parked close to the fork and walked up the branch which leads to what was once cultivated land and continues for some way. Quite a bit of bird-life up there and I got my first photos of White-headed Bulbul. When I got back to the car there was a mixed flock of birds moving fast high in the trees, saw Maroon Oriole and Long-tailed Broadbill but the only birds that would stay still for a photo were Drongos.



White-headed Bulbuls.

Day the next I went on down the main road towards Chaing Mai to the Wachirathon Waterfall first thing in the morning to beat the sightseers. First bird I saw was a Slaty-backed Forktail then a male Plumbeous Redstart then a Grey wagtail and Blue-whistling Thrush. The tourists had then started to arrive so I headed back to the previous days road seeing more birds including White-headed Bulbul and an uncommon Mrs Goulds Sunbird.



Mrs Goulds Sunbird.

Back to camp for lunch then a look at what is called a nature trail but a sign said it could only be walked with a local guide no doubt for a price so I gave that a miss and wandered around close to camp where I got photos of more birds.

Next day it was back to the dirt road and along the fork that goes to the reverting once cultivated land getting photos of more birds on the way.



Crested Goshawk.

General.

We were not asked for an entrance fee when we entered from the Mae Chaem (West, check point 2) side but when I exited there they wanted to see the tickets, we only had camping tickets but they let me go through. It would appear that if you have not paid an entry fee you are supposed to pay when you leave. When we left the park by the East entrance (check point 1 Chaing Mai side) we expected to pay an entry (exit) fee but were waved through. Result we did not pay an entry fee. Conclusion, an entry fee is charged when you enter from the West and if you have not paid an entry fee is charged when you exit in the East.

For what little its worth this is what I would do if I were to visit this park again.

Approach the park from the Mea Chaem or western side and spend 2 or 3 nights at the camp ground at Huai Sai Luang Waterfall, to stay there you don’t enter the park at the second checkpoint. In the morning there should be lots of birds in the trees around the camping area including flocks of Minivet. Head up the road to the parking area for the Mae Pan Waterfall and walk down to the waterfall, there should be birds on the way down and below the fall Redstarts, both Plumbeous and White-capped, and possibly Forktail in the stream.

Next day early, like 4.30 to 5am, head for the summit, to get there I don’t have to pass a checkpoint and as the checkpoint sign says it opens at 6am I should be able to beat the main influx of tourists who have been staying in the park or coming in from the east. Next morning pack up and enter the second checkpoint and camp at the caravan area at HQ area camping ground for another 2 or 3 nights. Then back to the dirt road at 34.5 KM which is probably the best bet for getting away from the crowds and seeing a good range of birds. In the evenings there should be birds in the trees between the camping area and the rental houses so I would have a wandering up the road.

In the morning head back to the dirt road park at the bottom and walk up, there is a clear area on the right about a hundred meters up where I will be able to look out at some tall trees where birds often perch early in the morning. Farther up the road take the left branch and follow as far as I want. I should start to see birds when I get to the first pine trees then farther on there is a tall tree down on the right where birds like to perch, I should see White-headed Bulbul there as well as other birds. Carrying on down the road there is a dip into a sort of gully where birds seem to congregate, I would stop there and watch, the main visitor will be Flavescent Bulbul but other more desirable species like Mrs Goulds Sunbirds and Rusty-cheeked Scimitar Babbler may appear. From there the road rises to the start of forest then heads downhill into the forest and up to me how far I feel like walking.

I would also have a look for what is called ‘the jeep track’ which I failed to find, but then I didn’t ask.

On the way home head out the other way towards Chaing mai and stop at Wachirathon Waterfall where I should see Forktail and Redstart.



Slaty-backed Forktail.

Birds

Crested Goshawk
Ashy Bulbul
Ashy Drongo
Asian Brown Flycatcher
Black Bulbul
Black-crested Bulbul
Blue Whistling Thrush
Bronzed Drongo
Emerald Cuckoo
Flavescent Bulbul
Golden-throated Barbet
Grey Wagtail
Grey-backed Shrike
Grey-cheeked Fulvetta
Grey-chinned Minivet
Mrs Goulds Sunbird
Olive-backed Pipit
Oriental Turtle Dove
Pinstripe Tit Babbler
Plumbeous Redstart
Rosy Minivet
Rusty-cheeked Scimitar Babbler
Scarlet Minivet
Slaty-backed Forktail
Sooty-headed Bulbul
Striated Yuhina
Verditer Flycatcher
White-bellied Green Pigeon
White-headed Bulbul
Yellow-cheeked Tit

RIP 2018 - Robby will always be remembered for his sharing of his trips and knowledge. Missed by all.

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14 Jan 2017 09:22 #4179 by Robby L
Replied by Robby L on topic Done the South so now a start on the North


We included this park as a break in the long trip home and only stayed for 2 nights, it is mainly known as a place where it is possible to climb and camp overnight on top of a hill (mountain to those who have never seen a real one) and on weekends there are a large number of people who camp up there, about 1000 on the Saturday when we were there and we were told 1700 the long weekend before. When we arrived there was a very noisy group of school children in the youth camp area so we set up out tent as far away from them as possible in a Sala close to the staff accommodation.



Banded Broadbill.

Next morning I had a wander around first to a small lake with an island in the middle then to where I could hear birds in tall trees close to the staff houses, they sounded like parakeets but no way could I see them instead I got some good photos of a Banded Broadbill an emerald Cuckoo and a Vernal Hanging Parrot.



Common Flameback.

Afternoon the lady boss wanted to go to the Sukhothai Historic Park which is at the north-east end of the park, after we had been to the historic park here was still time in the afternoon for a look at a parking spot about half way from the entrance gate to the camp ground, there I found a monk had a tent by a stream and on the other side of the stream there were lots of tracks through the forest, birds in there as well so I followed a track which eventually led me back to the road.



Part of the big Temple at the historic park.

Next morning it was pack up early for the long trip home.

General.

Entry fee 200b, this park is in a convenient place for an overnight or longer stop to break up what is about a 600km trip from northern parks to our home or Bangkok I will include it in future trips and may then climb the hill as there are probably different higher altitude birds to be seen.

Birds

Asian Fairy Bluebird
Banded Broadbill
Barwinged-flycatcher Shrike
Chinese Pond Heron
Common Flameback
Emerald Cuckoo
Hill Myna
Vernal Hanging Parrot




That was the last port of call for that trip, we plan to leave again on the 7 February for a trip taking in 13 national parks in the north right up to Burma border. Some of these parks have no information at all on the birds that may be there but looking at the 'book' there is huge potential for species that are unlikely to be seen elsewhere.
More reports when we get back home around 20 March.

Robby

RIP 2018 - Robby will always be remembered for his sharing of his trips and knowledge. Missed by all.
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15 Jan 2017 11:31 #4183 by Paul T
Replied by Paul T on topic Done the South so now a start on the North
I recall calling into Sukhothai National Park a couple of years ago and was amazed at how lush and green the lower levels were. I did not stay but thought one day I will come back and see if what the view is from the top - one day ;+)

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23 Jan 2017 17:03 #4210 by Robby L
Replied by Robby L on topic Done the South so now a start on the North
As I have finished the planning for our next two trips I thought I would write up a short preview of where we are going and what we hope to do there.

First stop on the way north will be Taksin Maharat NP between Tak and Mae Sot, we have been there before and know what to expect. This stop is to break up the long trip north for I don’t like driving more than 300km in a day, dangerous enough on the roads without getting tired. We will only stay one or two nights before moving on north to Mae Ngao NP which is north of Mae Moei NP in the same forest complex. This is an unknown park as far as birds are concerned so will be interesting, plan to stay 3 nights before heading to visit a friend of Ying somewhere near Mae Chaem.

From there the next stop is Nam Tok Mae Surin NP which is a long park in Mae Hong Son and is the first far north park on the list. There are said to be camping places in the southeast at a waterfall and at the HQ in the northwest so we plan to stay 3 nights at each. Seems there has been a recent survey of birds done in this park so there should be information of what and where.

As I was planning this trip I found some parks that are almost unknown and one of these is Tham Pla - Pha Suea NP which has HQ only about 16km up the road. This park goes to the Burma border in the west and north, there are several moo bahn scattered around and a road 1285 which goes right to the Burma border in the north. This road as well as others in the park goes through some interesting forest that should hold far north species, a 3 night stay is planned with a trip up 1285 right to the border post.

We then move on to Huai Nam Dang NP which is another less well known park that goes to the Burma border in the north there are roads into the interior of the park that should be very interesting, stay is planned for 3 days before moving on to Chaing Dao which is a wildlife sanctuary and the home of Thailand’s third highest mountain and a renowned birding place. There are 2 campsites here one at the HQ and another at high altitude at a place called Den Ya Kat we will have possibly 2 nights at the HQ and 3 up top depending on what we find.

Next we head to Pha Daeng NP another little known park that reaches to the Burma border. It is only 36KM up the road from Chaing Dao and should hold similar birdlife. Plan is to stay 3 nights depending on what we find.

It should be noted that all the parks from Mae Hong Son to Doi Lang are part of the same forest complex so should all hold similar birdlife.

From Pha Daeng we move on to Doi Ang Khang which is not a national park but has a camp ground at fairly high altitude and is a known bird spot, 3 nights are planned there. Next stop will be Doi Pha Hom Pok NP which used to be called Fang Hot Springs NP. There is a camp ground at Fang Hot Springs and another, the highest camp ground in Thailand, at Keiw Lom. We will stay 3 nights at the hot springs and Ying can slop around in the hot water while I go up the road on the west side of Doi Lang then another 3 nights at Keiw Lom.

Then it is on to Doi Lang, which is part of Doi Pha Hom Pok NP, to a camp ground on the east side road which forms a loop with the road on the west side which I will already have explored, where we will stay for another 3 nights.

From there we are on the long road south and home with stops at Mae Takhrai NP for 3 nights, this is another unknown that joins up with Chae Son NP, Doi Khun Tan NP and Khun Chae NP. Then on to Ramkhamhaeng NP for a night or two to break up the long trip home.

A note
I normally wear camo gear in forests but as the northern forests are the stamping ground of drug smugglers who will to be armed and are likely to shoot at anyone who they think is army or park ranger I went to the local night market yesterday and bought dull colored hopefully spike resistant gear that should I encounter baddies would not be mistaken for the enemy.


Robby

RIP 2018 - Robby will always be remembered for his sharing of his trips and knowledge. Missed by all.

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23 Jan 2017 17:09 #4211 by Paul T
Replied by Paul T on topic Done the South so now a start on the North
Sounds like a great trip Robby - have a fantastic time!!

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18 Mar 2017 20:24 #4308 by Robby L
Replied by Robby L on topic Done the South so now a start on the North
Back now after a great trip and still sorting out reports and photos.

First off:



Gave Thaksin Maharat N P a miss and went straight to Mae Ngao NP which is the same forest and north of Mae Moei NP. At the gate we were told no charge and camp anywhere, camp ground is along the river which gives the park its name, toilets are nothing flash but servisable.



Part of the camp ground

Next morning I had a wander round till Ying got ready to go exploring (driving) up some of the roads that lead into the interior. These roads are mostly rough dirt roads and some go up to 20km up the hills. The whole place is populated with hill tribe villages with a lot of the hillsides cleared for agriculture which means there is not a lot of the original forest left, what there is is mostly teak and other disideous trees with a bit of evergreen forest in some of the gullies.

We went to the end of the first road to a village then had a go at the second road which was very rough and not worth the effort, the third road led to another village where a woman was weaving. Ying lept out to have a look while I turned around, woman being what they are she ended up buying hand woven cloth and shirts so that’s why she brought an empty bag.



Part of the weaving village



Weaving

On the way back down the bird of the day posed beautifully for photos, a not often seen White-rumped Falconet. Most of the other birds seen were round the camping ground particularly on two flowering trees.



Female White-rumped Falconet

Next 2 mornings there was a heavy fog which made looking for birds difficult but I still managed to get a few photos.

An interesting first stop that has little original forest left what there is is mostly Teak and other dry disideous species, sad to see so much burnt and in agriculture, the term I think is modified but destroyed would be closer to the truth. Many of the people there live in very remote places in small villages, some have motorbikes some do not, they have their own language and only the young ones who have been to school speak Thai. There are some solar panels and satalite TV dishes in places but otherwise no power or gas with cooking done on wood fires. We were told that it is the girls who must propose marriage and they are the ones to pay Sin sod, one lady with 3 sons said it was great for boys are profit.



Hill Myna

I suspect these people will gradually move out of the forests as the old ones die off and the young see the outside world and no longer want to do the backbreaking work of farming the steep hilsides this will take a generation or two and there will still be the odd ones hanging on but the forests will then be able to start regenerating.

Birds.

White Wagtail
Grey Wagtail
Greater Flameback
White-rumped Falconet
Black-caped kingfisher
White-throated Kingfisher
Indian Rollar
Hill Myna
Black-crested Bulbul
Chestnut –headed Bee Eater
Greater-necklaced Laughingthrush
Greater Racket-tailed Drongo
Green Leafbird
Ashy Drongo
Chestnut-tailed Starling
Olive-backed Pipit
Long-tailed Shrike

RIP 2018 - Robby will always be remembered for his sharing of his trips and knowledge. Missed by all.
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19 Mar 2017 19:08 #4310 by Robby L
Replied by Robby L on topic Done the South so now a start on the North
Next on the list was a visit to Yings friend but after about 20KM up a rough roag the road was blocked by a gang building a new bridge so it was turn around and head for :

Nam Tok Mae Surin NP

Although it the same park I will separate the waterfall area from the HQ area for they are about 100km apart by road.
Waterfall.

Arrived just on dark and set up the tent, will fnish the rest of the camp in the morning.



After setting up the camp I had a wander round the camp ground which is quite spacious and empty other than us, I then had a look at the waterfall from the lookouts and round the camp ground although there is only a small area there were plenty of birds about. Barbets were calling constantly all day and Gibbons joined the chorus. I read somewhere that the presence of Gibbons signifies a healthy forest and the number of birds here would also indicate that. The forest is mostly evergreen with some Teak higher up the hills.



Blue-throated Barbet

This is a place that should be on birders itinerary for there are many species without crowds of people. There are many more species here than I recorded for I missed lots of Photo opportunities and got several poor shots that I could not ID. Birds were mostly round the camp ground and around the waterfall lookouts.



White-headed Bulbul

We only paid for the nights camping and entry for the car, no charge per person. No power at the camp area or toilets, there is a generator sitting behind what has been a restaurant but it seems that it as well as the restaurant and shop buildings are only used for a couple of weeks in November when the sunflower fields at Bua Tong are in bloom for it is then that crowds come to see the flowers and many stay overnight at the camp ground. There are houses for rent and people stayed in one on the second night we were there. Dogs are present so food must be secured.



White's Thrush


Birds
Bronzed Drongo
Ashy Drongo
Lomg-tailed Shrike
Scarlet Minivet
White-headed Bulbul
Black Bulbul
Asian Brown Flycatcher
Black-crested Bulbul
Asian-fairy Bluebird
Asian-brown Flycatcher
Blue-throated Barbet
Blue-winged Leafbird
Brown-cheeked Fulvetta
Chestnut-flanked White Eye
Eurasian Jay
Grey-backed Shrile
Long-tailed Broadbill
Mrs Goulds Sunbird
Oriental White Eye
Slaty-backed Flycatcher
White’s Thrush
Verditer Flycatcher
Red-throated Pipit



Headquarters area.

Again no charge for entry only paid for the nights camping and car entry, good camping area close to a river and toilets with mains power and lights at night, houses for rent but didn’t ask price.



Female Scarlet Minivet

Not a huge area to explore but lots of bird calls on a short loop road that runs past a nursery area and a rough road up to a dam that holds big fish and several people trying to catch them. There is another rough road which starts at the beginning of the dam road and leads up the river to agricultural land.
Most of the birds seen were around the loop road and up the gully on the far side of the dam. There is a walking track that goes round the dam and tracks up the gully, some pig sign up there and also a pack of dogs.



Asian Barred Owlet

I had read of a nature trail at Mae Sareng 17km south of the HQ where there were said to be lots of birds, after having to pay 200b to walk the trail I found the bit about plenty of birdlife to be a fiction and a waste of 200b. I did continue to drive up the road that passes that trail but saw very little.
Friendly staff who gave us far to many vegitables which they grow themselves, mains power with lights on at night and charging points for batteries, there are some dogs but they gave us no trouble. A nice place to stay close to Mae Hong Son for fuel and anything else that’s needed and coupled with the waterfall to the south a great park for birds.



Male Purple Sunbird

Birds

Blue-winged Leafbird
Golden-fronted Leafbird
White-bellied Woodpecker
Black-headed Woodpecker
Asian-barred Owlet
Common Flameback
Hill Myna
Asian Brown Flycatcher
Bronzed Drongo
Spangled Drongo
Collared Falconet
Coppersmith Barbet
Liniated Barbet
Common Kingfisher
Grey-headed Parakeet
Pied Bushchat
Thick-billed Green Pigeon
White-crested laughingthrush
Purple Sunbird
Blue Rock Thrush
Little (striated) heron
Little-green Bee Eater
Spotted Dove

RIP 2018 - Robby will always be remembered for his sharing of his trips and knowledge. Missed by all.

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20 Mar 2017 16:28 #4313 by Paul T
Replied by Paul T on topic Done the South so now a start on the North
Great reports and insights as usual Robby.

I wondered if anyone knew of any books or papers on the modernization of the Hill Tribes? It seems a culture destined to pass - sadly - but what worries me more is as they move to market (rather than sufficiency) farming, which is already happening because they too have a right to development and betterment. Can they survive without hunting and tree clearing? My opinion has always been a negative but I would like to read up on it.

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21 Mar 2017 11:58 #4316 by Robby L
Replied by Robby L on topic Done the South so now a start on the North
Hi Paul

Google "modernization of Thailand Hill Tribes" and you will get a whole string of stuff which I have not read.

From what I have seen unless the roads are improved greatly the more remote villages will start to decline as the young people see the outside world and the opportunities for what they see as a better life. With the roads as they are it is difficult and in some cases impossible to get produce to markets. Those closer to towns or main roads will continue to live on their land and change to market crops that give them a better income, in those situations it is possible that they will farther encroach on forests.
I saw this at Huai Mae Dee where although they have changed to growing strawberries and other high value crops they still grow corn on the hills right up to the tree line then they burn the stubble with the fire spreading into the forest. They then clear a couple of meters farther up the hill for the next crop, creeping encroachment.

In Doi Phu Hom Pok which I will come to later Ying had a good talk to some of the locals who told her that in one village on the steep hillsides there were once 40 families living in that village now there are 14 which is an example of the young people moving out as the old people die off. And this was on a good concrete access road, so on bad roads with in many instances no access in the wet where the people live a subsistence lifestyle in bamboo thatched roof houses this is probably what will happen.

Robby

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22 Mar 2017 13:27 #4320 by Robby L
Replied by Robby L on topic Done the South so now a start on the North


300 Baht entry which is a bit steep but we ended up staying 6 nights so not to bad, spacious terraced camp grounds with good toilets but very windy up there at 1700m above sea level, we set up camp in a sort of sheltered place close to toilets and I did the usual wander round to get to know the place getting a few photos. After a windy and cold night, down to 11c with the wind chill making it feel closer to freezing, dressed for the cold I went round the camp grounds getting some good photos.



Spectacled barwing

Once Ying had got out of her warm bed we went for a drive up the road that heads to into the interior of the park and to villages and a watershed conservation area, this is another Royal project things we see everywhere we go and in the most remote places. There are houses for rent there that must be booked in advance and a camp ground which at close to 2000m above sea level must qualify for one of the highest camp ground in the country, the place looks really good and we decided to head up there to camp for 2 or 3 nights.



Walking down the road one evening.

Many good birds around the HQ camp and toilets and a sala across the other side of the road from our tent, birds would come in the morning to feed on the insects attracted to the lights at night and still there in the morning. There are dogs a cat and buffalo wandering around at night so once again food security is important. We were told that the late King donated a pair of buffalo to the park about 40 years ago and they have now bred up to a herd of around 30 which has turned semi nocturnal and sometimes wanders into the camp area at night making a pest of themselves, at least one has a bell attached probably one of the original pair. Doubt they were from wild stock but it is possible as there would have been wild herds in several places back then.



Verditar Flycatcher.

Headquarters and visitor center are just down from the camp ground, this is where nice looking rent houses are, there is also a firebreak road in the left about a KM up the road which we drove along for about a KM, all these places are worth a look for birds.



This little fella kept following me around, Grey Bushchat.


After 3 nights we packed up camp and went 18km up a not to bad road to Doi Sam Muan camp ground, second gear most of the way with first needed in places, 4WD would be required in the wet but not when we went. Set up camp just before a mob of kids from the school down the road turned up to play football, seems we were on their football ground.




The camp Ground is sheltered from the wind and below are 3 rent houses which must be booked in advance, there is also a meeting room and small museum which unfortunately has not been well maintained. The project was set up by the late King 40 years ago as part of an iniciative to get the farmers off growing poppies which were at the time the main crop in the area. A bird survey was done there 18-19 years ago and a list of 128 species recorded is posted in the meuseum along with some photos. There was a flock of small birds roosting in the trees by the camp ground the only one I managed to get a photo of was a Great Tit, there is another large tree with some bare branches that I saw several species stopping at in the morning and a gully down the road at a small shop that sells food and snacks that holds small birds in the evening.



Grey-backed Shrike

General

This park with the 2 camp grounds with good accommodation at both should be a must on any birding itinerary to the north for there are many species that are easy to observe. The corn stubble up high is ideal habitat for wintering Buntings and others and I saw 3 species, Mrs Humes Pheasent is present, I had a female fly past my head and disappear into the scrub but no photos.



The road to Doi Sam Muan continues on round the back of Chiang Dao with birding all the way. We will return.



Birds HQ area.


Grey Bushchat
Hoopoe
Spectacled Bar-wing
Red-eared bulbul
Flavescent Bulbul
White Wagtail
Grey Wagtail
Large-billed Crow
Sotty-headed Bulbul
Grey-backed Shrike
Scarlet Minivet
Long-tailed minivet
Blue Rock Thrush
Oriental White Eye
Asian-brown Flycatcher
Grey-backed Shrike
Magpie Robin
Dark-backed Sibia
Common Rosefinch

Birds Doi Sam Muan.

Mountain Bulbul
Flavescent Bulbul
Red-eared Bulbul
Verditer Flycatcher
Great Tit
Silver-eared Mesia
Maroon Oriole
Ashy Wood Swallow
Ashy Drongo
Blue-bearded Bee Eater
Blue Rock Thrush
Burmese Shrike
Chestnut Bunting
Eastern Stonechat
Eyebrowed Thrush
Grey-backed Shrike
Grey Bushchat
Grey-headed Woodpecker
Long-tailed Minivet
Long-tailed Shrike
Magpie Robin
Olive-backed Pipit
Oriental-turtle Dove
Pied Bushchat
Red Jungle Fowl
Short-billed Minivet
Siberian-blue Robin
Sooty-headed Bulbul
Velvet-fronted Nuthatch
Oriental White Eye
Yellow-breasted Bunting
Grey-eyed Bulbul
Comon Rosefinch

RIP 2018 - Robby will always be remembered for his sharing of his trips and knowledge. Missed by all.

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