× Over 400 species of birds are known to occur within the Park’s boundaries, and 57 mammals. Larger mammals include elephant, gaur, sambar deer, banteng, serow, and bear, indo-chinese tiger, leopard, both common and Fea’s muntjac. Malayan tapir, white-handed gibbon, dusky and banded langurs, Asian wild dog, otter, and wild boar.

Kaeng Krachan in November

04 Dec 2014 06:06 #2555 by Paul T
Replied by Paul T on topic Kaeng Krachan in November
What an absolutely fantastic haul of great images and sighting! Beautiful pictures!
The following user(s) said Thank You: onflipflops

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

04 Dec 2014 07:22 #2556 by Bagheera
Replied by Bagheera on topic Kaeng Krachan in November
These are awesome photos aswell Flipflops, I especially like your snake photography, brilliant!
Both you fellas are setting the bar very high!
The following user(s) said Thank You: onflipflops

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

04 Dec 2014 07:55 - 04 Dec 2014 07:55 #2557 by Paul T
Replied by Paul T on topic Kaeng Krachan in November
On the insects:

1. Pyrops spinolae (lantern bug)
2. Pyrops karenia (lantern bug)
3. Saiva gemmata (lantern bug)
4. Penthicodes pulchella (lantern bug)
5. A Dictyopharidae (close relative of a lantern bug and not very commonly seen in my own experience)
6. Herennia ornatissima (AKA Ornamental Tree Trunk Spider)
7. A froghopper as you've already said (no idea on species)
8. The Tarantula - no idea


Bagheera - I am sure once you are back in action you are going to be teaching us all a few things!
The following user(s) said Thank You: onflipflops

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

04 Dec 2014 09:19 #2559 by rushenb
Replied by rushenb on topic Kaeng Krachan in November
Fantastic shots!
The following user(s) said Thank You: onflipflops

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

04 Dec 2014 09:52 #2560 by onflipflops
Replied by onflipflops on topic Kaeng Krachan in November
Thanks Trekker for your comments and IDs!
When I saw that tiny green thing it did look a bit like a Lantern Bug so I thought I'd better get a shot and share it with the Lantern bug fanatics from this forum ;) good to know it is some sort of relative.
Apart from P. spinolae of which I already mentioned the location, all the others were just found around the Ban Krang camp. Well, P. karenia was found on the camp and on the Vanille nature trail.
The frog hopper was found along the trail to the Pran Buri waterfall.

I had a look at google and found something about tarantulas.
Tarantula breeders are talking about the Chilobrachys sp. kaeng krachan. Dark Earthtiger.
Pictures seem to match, but maybe I am wrong. I set up my flashes wit DIY shoot through umbrella and had to guess focus on my 17-35mm 2.8 lens. At one point the tarantula cam all the way out but I had set focus a bit deeper in the burrow, so that shot was too much out of focus. It might be useful for ID, though, I don't know...

Thanks Bagheera!
I was quite happy with the snake shots. Advantage of snakes, at least some species, is that you can really take the time to set up a nice shot. The Oriental Vine Snakes and also the pit vipers are great models that tend to pose long enough to get everything like you want it. For some of the shots I used a DIY 50cm diameter shoot through umbrella attached to a radio triggered flash on top of a 'Selfie-handle'. Gives nice soft light for snake- sized animals.
It is quite common practise these days to do wide-angle reptile-in-habitat shots, so it is not exactly original anymore, but still I like the looks. The shots of the vine snake in the vines is not perfect, this individual did not pose as good as some of the others, but still I liked all the curly vines and the similarly shaped snake.

I agree with Trekker that we can not wait for you, Bagheera, to get 'back to business'.
I talked with the rangers at Ban Krang about leopards and they mentioned you, because your great image is on the wall there. They did not hear about your accident yet, and were sorry to hear about it. They told you are a good guy with a heart for nature.

BTW it so pleasant to be in Kaeng Krachan where the rangers are so much more friendly and helpful than most of the rangers in Khao Yai. And they understand why people like us come to these parks, they keep an eye on you but give you the freedom to do what you want, at least if you appear to be an experienced jungle trekker. That made a stay much more pleasant.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Bagheera

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

12 Dec 2014 09:34 #2587 by Painted Jezebel
Replied by Painted Jezebel on topic Kaeng Krachan in November
Absolutely stunning photos, congratulations.

One id correction required. Trekker, your photo of the Sesiidae is actualy Erebidae/Arctiinae/Syntomini. The Syntomini are a mess, and much work needs to be done on them. It is generally impossible to id to species level based on photos alone.

Sesiidae are usually easily recognisable, by having hairy legs!
The following user(s) said Thank You: Paul T

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

"Each species is a masterpiece, a creation assembled with extreme care and genius." > Edward O. Wilson

"An understanding of the Natural World and whats in it is a source of not only a great curiosity but great fulfillment." > Sir David Attenborough

“Climb up on some hill at sunrise.  Everybody needs perspective once in a while, and you’ll find it there.” > Robb Sagendorph

©2020 wildlifethailand.com