× Over 400 species of birds are known to occur within the Park’s boundaries, and 57 mammals. Larger mammals include elephant, gaur, sambar deer, banteng, serow, and bear, indo-chinese tiger, leopard, both common and Fea’s muntjac. Malayan tapir, white-handed gibbon, dusky and banded langurs, Asian wild dog, otter, and wild boar.

New species discoveries in Kaeng Krachan

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3 years 4 months ago - 3 years 4 months ago #2848 by Paul T
A partial excerpt from a WWF article on new species discoveries.
full article links at end of text

............Another fascinating species that was discovered in Thailand but also occurs in Myanmar is a brightly coloured bronzeback snake, commonly called the Sawtooth-Necked Bronzeback. Discovered in southern Thailand’s Kaeng Krachan National Park (which borders Myanmar), the snake was in the middle of consuming a Wallace’s Flying Frog. It is usually found in hilly evergreen forests but is absent in deforested areas, underscoring the need to further explore the region’s hilly forests and protect areas of high biodiversity.

“These species discoveries affirm that the Greater Mekong is truly one of the world’s richest and most biologically diverse regions,” said Michelle Owen, WWF-Myanmar Conservation Programme Manager. “The fact that 26 species were discovered in relatively unexplored Myanmar highlights the urgent need to invest in conservation and ensure biodiversity is considered as part of a sustainable and green development approach.”

Another new species found in Kaeng Krachan National Park is a parachute gecko (Ptychozoon kaengkrachanense). The camouflage-patterned gecko extends flaps of skin on its flanks and between its toes to help it glide down from branch to tree trunk.

“Kaeng Krachan National Park and the forests across the border in Myanmar are some of the least explored areas in Southeast Asia,” Owen added. “This landscape is the beating heart for species recovery in Thailand and Myanmar, and Kaeng Krachan is home to one of the world’s most important tiger populations. These new discoveries confirm the importance of conservation efforts by WWF and partners in this awe-inspiring and ecologically important landscape.”................


Read full WWF article by clicking here

Read alternative WWF article with photographs here

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3 years 4 months ago - 3 years 4 months ago #2850 by onflipflops
Replied by onflipflops on topic New species discoveries in Kaeng Krachan
How cool is that, before I even have started a search for the species I encountered, I get the answer delivered on wildlifethailand.com.
Two days ago, in Kaeng Krachan, I parked the car to take a quick photo of a monitor lizard basking on the road between Ban Krang and the first river crossing.
All of a sudden, just a metre or two down the road behind the monitor lizard, a snake was moving fast across the road. I immediately recognized it as a Bronzeback species which are harmless snakes. So I immediately ran towards it.
At the same time I noticed this very striking pattern on its side that was very different from what I have seen in other Bronzeback species. The pattern was very clearly visible, indicating that it must have been a bit stressed, probably because it had seen the monitor lizard.
It reached the forested roadside faster than I did, and even though I touched the tail, it slipped out of my hands and disappeared up into the bamboo as fast as Bronzebacks usually do.

A look in my guide books did not show me the striking pattern that I had seen.
Just got home, and I had forgotton to start searching for the species.
But now I read this article, googled the name, Sawtooth-necked Bronzeback (Dendrelaphis nigroserratus), and images of a snake with the exact pattern that i had seen 2 days ago, shows up.
How cool!
Another lifer.
Also was lucky to finally add Fea's Muntjac to my lifelist. It had eluded me on my many visits, and now got to see it two days in a row at different spots, 4 individuals in total.

Thanks for sharing this article!
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3 years 4 months ago #2851 by Paul T
Replied by Paul T on topic New species discoveries in Kaeng Krachan
I have been following how this story has been passed from news source to news source. Each adding their own spice to the story. The Mail and Guardian made quite a blunder...............................

"The new species of parachute gecko was discovered in the evergreen forest in western Thailand’s Kaeng Krachan National Park, which also hosts one of the world’s biggest tiger populations. ........"

You cant believe all you read ;+)

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3 years 4 months ago #2852 by onflipflops
Replied by onflipflops on topic New species discoveries in Kaeng Krachan
Haha, I guess that is part of the new promotion campaign of the Tourist Authority of Thailand to draw all wildlife tourists from India to Thailand.
On your next visit to Kaeng Krachan, be prepared for traffic congestions of 20 - 30 Suzuki Samurais each carrying 20 noisy tourists gathering around one of the waterholes along the road to Ban Krang.

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2 years 9 months ago #3347 by Bjarnie
Replied by Bjarnie on topic New species discoveries in Kaeng Krachan




This two Pictures show a thousand legger (Millepede) who was found in Kaeng Krachan NP (Half Way between Ban Krang and Panoen Thung). The Species is a „Thyropygus“. But the Subspecies is unknown.
We asked an Expert for thousand legger (Millepede) at the well known Natural History Museum „Senckenberg“. After he talked with a colleague he said that, because of the place of discovery, it could be an unknown and new Subspecies.

The problem is, that it is very difficult to identify the correct Subspecies by a Photo. There are 53 Subspecies of „Thyropygus“ and we make sure, we need a conserved and an adult (pubescent) Male. Than, with a look on the form of sex, maybe we discovered a new Species.

So, have anybody seen this thousand legger before? Or have anybody any Information about it?
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2 years 9 months ago - 2 years 9 months ago #3348 by Paul T
Replied by Paul T on topic New species discoveries in Kaeng Krachan
It takes a brave person to ID many arthropods accurately at species level and subspecies level is even harder. Most IDers stay higher up the classification to remain correct. Thyropygus are very common throughout Thailand but at species level I would have no idea of the differences. Many have IDed this or similar as "Thyropygus alleviates" but I think you will be safer with just Thyropygus sp. or "Thyropygus alleviates group".

Actually, it is estimated that only about 1 in 10 arthropods are actually "known" to science at species level so its very common to not be able to ID an arthropod specifically. BTW the literature points to a reworking of the classification for this "Thyropygus alleviates group" in 2008 when 8 new species were IDed for Thailand.

It very well could be a new species but as you have already said - a true ID is not possible without an expert, a specimen, a knife and a microscope.

Cool pictures!
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2 years 7 months ago #3509 by Bjarnie
Replied by Bjarnie on topic New species discoveries in Kaeng Krachan
A new Bent-toed Gecko (Squamata: Gekkonidae: Cyrtodactylus) from Phetchaburi Province, Thailand

A new Bent-toed Gecko, Cyrtodactylus phetchaburiensis sp. nov. is described from the Tha Yang District of Phetchaburi Province, western Thailand. It is a medium-sized Cyrtodactylus (SVL to at least 63.2 mm), with small, mostly keeled tubercles in 20 regular longitudinal rows on dorsum; 33 scales across mid-venter between lowest rows of flank tubercles; enlarged row of femoral scales present; five precloacal pores in male, femoral pores and precloacal groove absent; 5–6 broad basal lamellae and 11 narrow distal lamellae beneath digit IV of pes; and a single median row of transversely enlarged subcaudal scales present. It has a dorsal colour pattern of large, dark, diffusely-edged markings on a fawn background and a pair of dark scapular patches. The species is a member of the Central Indochinese (Thai-Myanmar) clade of Cyrtodactylus and is most closely related to C. oldhami (Theobald), from which it differs in colour pattern.

Source: www.mapress.com/j/zt/article/view/zootaxa.4088.3.6
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2 years 7 months ago #3517 by onflipflops
Replied by onflipflops on topic New species discoveries in Kaeng Krachan
Too bad no pictures were added to the newly described Cyrtodactylus species. Even though I understand that a picture might not be enough for ID-purposes, it would still at least give us a slight idea what to look for. I have seen C. oldhami in Kaeng Krachan, and if that is the most closely related species, it would be nice to know how similar or different it is, or if the ones seen in Kaeng Krachan are indeed that new species.

Reptiles are still quite a mess. It will probably many years before the majority of the reptile species in Thailand are accurately documented.
Not to mention the amphibians...

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