× Over 400 species of birds are known to occur within the Park’s boundaries, and 57 mammals. Larger mammals include elephant, gaur, sambar deer, banteng, serow, and bear, indo-chinese tiger, leopard, both common and Fea’s muntjac. Malayan tapir, white-handed gibbon, dusky and banded langurs, Asian wild dog, otter, and wild boar.

Food for thought

  • Geoff Potter
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2 years 8 months ago - 2 years 8 months ago #3397 by Geoff Potter
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This bear is now being fed regularly in KKC and is out most evenings in the scout camp opposite Bang Krang camp. Fried fish and rice seem to be its preferred diet.

Any thoughts?

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2 years 8 months ago - 2 years 8 months ago #3398 by Paul T
Replied by Paul T on topic Food for thought
Just saw the video on Facebook as well. IMHO should be stopped and made sure no one can continue with it. If it continues the animal will get confused and then an accident is on the cards.

Strangely enough - has anyone noticed a "friendly" pied hornbill in Baan Krang as well? I figure it has habituation issues as well. Last weekend one climbed into the back of my covered pickup and climbed inside my wellington boot and then spent 15 minutes sat on my open door.

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2 years 8 months ago #3400 by rushenb
Replied by rushenb on topic Food for thought
This one yes.. Released from captivity.. I was very surprised when it flew and landed on kitchen wall.. I approached like up to couple of meters.. Than I heard from people what it was about.

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2 years 8 months ago #3401 by rushenb
Replied by rushenb on topic Food for thought
... and. I really don't like the idea of a bear being fed. I don't even like to photo those porcupines behind the kitchen, it doesn't look natural.
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2 years 8 months ago #3403 by Geoff Potter
Replied by Geoff Potter on topic Food for thought
The issue here is that the bear is going to associate people with food, then its just a matter of time before it enters the campsite. This kind of thing is a huge problem in North America and I am afraid that if the KKC officials don't do something about it someone could be seriously injured.

Hope its not me, do bears like beer?

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2 years 8 months ago #3404 by bootly66
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Geoff Potter wrote: The issue here is that the bear is going to associate people with food, then its just a matter of time before it enters the campsite. This kind of thing is a huge problem in North America and I am afraid that if the KKC officials don't do something about it someone could be seriously injured.

Hope its not me, do bears like beer?

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2 years 8 months ago #3405 by bootly66
Replied by bootly66 on topic Food for thought
I have seen some pics of the bear today, obviously taken during daylight hours... This really does create an issue of the bear taking a stroll through the campsite..If the bear did become aggressive and attack (or defending it's territory) what would be the best course of action?? I read that a bear will retreat at the sound of gunfire, and was just thinking with Chinese new year coming up ,maybe a waterproof box with a few of them firecrackers may be a worthwhile addition to the kit..

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2 years 8 months ago #3406 by onflipflops
Replied by onflipflops on topic Food for thought
Totally agree this should be stopped immediately!
I noticed quite a few pictures on FB, but since it all seemed the same location I assumed it was the same sighting.
Though today again I saw new pictures in different light, and video, better pictures which made me wonder why the photographer did not post these instead of the first ones. But now it makes sense, as it is more than one sighting.

Please express your concerns about this with the rangers, I guess especially P'Pong at Ban Krang, perhaps some accompanying pictures from American Black Bears breaking into cars or even injuring people would help...
Feeding porcupines is one thing (not that I totally agree), but feeding bears is another!
I will be there in a week or so, and will definitely bring this up. If everybody shares his opinion with the rangers, the more likely something will be done. Or basically, the thing is, nothing should be done, meaning: no feeding!
At the same time I will most likely be a hypocrite and have a look to see if it shows up...
I am not really fond of the porcupine feeding spot, but at least so far that's mostly only visited by some rodents, civets and late at night jackals. In a way it is nice people have an easy opportunity to see some wild creatures, which is also part of awareness - learning what lives in these forests -, but it's not a zoo. And actually the rangers set a wrong example with it. If they do it, how can they possibly judge visitors to do the same in front of their tent?
It surprises me that the leaf monkeys still show little interest in the people. Maybe they are just not as bad as macaques...

Anyhow, increasing tourist numbers will slowly make wildlife more habituated to the human presence, which in general I think is not a bad thing. Like visible in all major parks in the world, e.g. the Kruger park in Africa, where the lions couldn't care less if you park 1 metre next to them. It has nothing to do with people feeding them. It is simply, as soon as hunting stops (at least in tourist areas), and a large number of people continue to visit daily without truly bothering the animals, it will make the animals more relaxed and learn that people don't do them any harm. Some would argue it is not natural if an animal is not scared of people, but humans have evolved from hunters into farmers over the ages so we are no longer 'predators' (generally speaking ;-) ), so there is no reason for the animals to fear (most) humans, so it IS natural. A deer also doesn't run when an elephant walks nearby. Simply, because it knows the elephant won't harm it. As soon as elephants start to evolve in predators hunting for deer, surely no deer will stand by to watch an elephant get closer.
Same is visible in Khao Yai where many gibbon families are habituated either due to tourist presence, or most likely actually started by the presence of researchers.
It is not necessarily a bad thing. It basically means the animals will be less stressed, and just continue with their normal behaviour, instead of having to flee in fear.
But to speed this process by feeding, is not the right way.
There is a big difference between being habituated simply due to presence of humans and learning we don't attack them, and being habituated due to feeding which will turn the animals into beggars and thiefs.

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