× The park is the third largest in Thailand. It covers an area of 300 square kilometers, including tropical seasonal forests and grasslands. Its altitude mostly ranges from 400–1,000 m above sea level. There are 3,000 species of plants, 320 species of birds, and 67 species of mammals, recording in this, Thailand's most famous National Park.

Southern Khao Yai/Nakhon Nayok advice

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4 years 5 months ago - 4 years 5 months ago #1917 by NN
For the past few years I've been living in Nakhon Nayok, almost bordering KY. A friend lent me his Sigma 170-300mm and I started photographing bird with my Canon 650D. I hope to get the Tamron 150-600mm.

Is there anyone else photographing in this area? I'd be interested in advice for location, species, times etc.

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4 years 5 months ago #1924 by onflipflops
Replied by onflipflops on topic Southern Khao Yai/Nakhon Nayok advice
Are you looking for locations inside the national park, or outside the park?
I only know locations inside the park, but don't know the Southern border areas.
Any specific bird species you are looking for?
There are too many species to just list it here.
I don't know everything, but I visit the park a lot (not in the last month, I'm visiting family in Europe).

Just a tip. If you are a beginning birder it works best to first learn the bird calls. Choose some species you would really love to see and listen to their calls.
Check www.xeno-canto.org/ for bird calls.
As soon as you get familiar with the calls, learn to reconize specific types of birds it will make spotting so much easier.
This season is usually quite interesting with nesting birds.

So if you have any specific target species, maybe I can help to point you in the right direction.

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4 years 5 months ago #1925 by onflipflops
Replied by onflipflops on topic Southern Khao Yai/Nakhon Nayok advice
BTW a lens like the Tamron 150-600mm (and for the darker light conditions in the dark) is a must.
The 300mm will come short for most birds.

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4 years 5 months ago #1931 by NN
Replied by NN on topic Southern Khao Yai/Nakhon Nayok advice
Thanks for the info.

Although I'm not looking for any species in particular, I would love to shoot some birds of prey. Are hornbills found in the lower elevations around KY? I've been in forested areas, but the bird life seems more plentiful in open areas and the light is better for photography.

I'm partly writing as an introduction. If anyone is visiting NN pls feel free to contact me. I know the southern border area well. In one area a ranger told me there are bears and in another I saw lot of gaur tracks. I'd be interested in photographing there, but am concerned about safety.

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4 years 5 months ago #1932 by onflipflops
Replied by onflipflops on topic Southern Khao Yai/Nakhon Nayok advice
I was watching the following review on the Tamron 150-600 and this photographer compared it to the Canon fixed 400mm f5.6 (not to mistake with the 100-400mm zoom) which according to these people sells second hand for about the same price as the Tamron, only they say it is quite a bit sharper, even with teleconverter.

Since you say you are into birds, it will hardly ever happen that you would like to zoom out.
The 400mm + 1.4 converter would give you a 560mm lens, and on your 650D body it would compare to a 896mm on a full-frame body.

Though, they say the Tamron is not bad either, but maybe worth to look into this option.
Not sure if you can find a second hand version of that 400mm lens in Thailand, though...

Here's a link to the review on youtube.


While writing this I remembered there is one downside for the 400mm + 1.4 converter combination. The widest aperture will be f/8 which might cause focussing problems with your camera especially in low light. So maybe this was not a good idea after all for the Thai Jungle conditions, haha. Anyway, maybe interesting to look into it... without converter it still compares to a 640mm on a full frame body.

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4 years 5 months ago #1934 by Paul T
Replied by Paul T on topic Southern Khao Yai/Nakhon Nayok advice
Thats right flip-flops, a minimum aperture of f8 will cause problems with most camera's ability to autofocus. It would become, effectively, a manual focus combination on most camera setups for the lens/convertor combination if min AP is f8.

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4 years 5 months ago - 4 years 5 months ago #1935 by Paul T
Replied by Paul T on topic Southern Khao Yai/Nakhon Nayok advice

NN wrote: Thanks for the info.

Although I'm not looking for any species in particular, I would love to shoot some birds of prey. Are hornbills found in the lower elevations around KY? I've been in forested areas, but the bird life seems more plentiful in open areas and the light is better for photography.

I'm partly writing as an introduction. If anyone is visiting NN pls feel free to contact me. I know the southern border area well. In one area a ranger told me there are bears and in another I saw lot of gaur tracks. I'd be interested in photographing there, but am concerned about safety.


... Hornbills is southern elevations - yes, as long as the forest is intact and there are large fruiting canopy trees and nesting locations, Hornbills will be present throughout. Obviously as you reach border lands were forest is secondary (rather than primary) and recovering from previous logging/denudation, then highly questionable for resident birds.

.... knowledge of NN and associated areas, pls do share any information you may feel relevant or are asked about - its the noble purpose of the site, to share... and inspire others to experience... its great we have you on the forum to share your experiences with others.

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4 years 5 months ago #1936 by NN
Replied by NN on topic Southern Khao Yai/Nakhon Nayok advice
I was considering that option before the Tamron came out. Reading reviews, a lot of ppl are saying the Canon is better for BIF, sharper with better AF, but in other situation generally the Tamron is a touch better.

I'm keen to shoot wild life, just a matter of getting some to appear in front of me, so I think the zoom will be useful. Also, zooming makes it easier to find things, rather than struggling with the lens wound right out. Maybe I will improve with practice?

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